Symposia

Symposium 1:
New Experimental Trends in Analytical Electrochemistry (details)

Symposium 2:
Flow and Microfluidic Systems in Analytical Electrochemistry (details)

Symposium 3:
Electrochemical Approaches to Clinical Diagnostics and Medical Devices (details)

Symposium 4:
Bioelectrochemistry without Borders (details)

Symposium 5:
Novel Materials and Devices for Energy Storage:
Batteries for Tomorrow’s World
(details)

Symposium 6:
Fuel Cells and Electrolyzers (details)

Symposium 7:
Supercapacitors from Materials and Processes to Applications (details)

Symposium 8:
Dealloying: Fundamentals, Application, and Control(details)

Symposium 9:
Ionic Liquids as Media for Electrochemical Synthesis (details)

Symposium 10:
Corrosion: Fundamentals, Passivity, and Prevention (details)

Symposium 11:
Synthesis and Applications of Electrochemically Active Materials(details)

Symposium 12:
Electrochemical Technology for solving 21st Century Challenges (details)

Symposium 13:
The Green Potential of Molecular Electrochemistry (details)

Symposium 14:
Let there be Light in Electrochemistry:
From Electrogenerated Chemiluminescence to Fluorescence
(details)

Symposium 15:
Physical and Interfacial Electrochemistry: Structural, Spectroscopic, and Theoretical Studies of the Electrochemical Interface (details)

Symposium 16:
Electrochemistry of Metal Clusters and Nanoparticles (details)

Symposium 17:
Advances in Theory and Modeling of Electrochemical Systems (details)

Symposium 18:
Education for Electrochemistry and Electrochemical Engineering (details)

Symposium 19:
General Session (details)




Symposium 1:

New Experimental Trends in Analytical Electrochemistry

Sponsored by:
Division 1, Analytical Electrochemistry

Our quest is to measure more effectively the world around us, to evaluate the future needs, and to drive advances in electroanalytical chemistry from many directions. New and optimized instrumental techniques and experimental trends that are aimed at filling gaps and addressing shortcomings in established methods have to be developed. These should enable convenient monitoring of newly identified analytes important to human and environmental health and will provide faster analyses in real complex media and harsh conditions. This symposium will highlight recent advances in all these areas of analytical electrochemistry.

Symposium Organizers
Priscilla Baker
(Coordinator), University of the Western Cape, South Africa pbaker@uwc.ac.za
Carol Korzeniewski, Texas Tech University, USA
José M. Pingarron, Complutense University of Madrid, Spain
Philippe Buhlmann, University of Minnesota, USA

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Symposium 2:
Flow and Microfluidic Systems in Analytical Electrochemistry

Sponsored by:
Division 1, Analytical Electrochemistry

TFlow systems with electrochemical detection offer many advantages including convenience of sample handling, minimization of sample size, speed of analysis, and generation of rich data. Both ‘macro’ scale systems and miniaturized portable lab-on-a-chip devices are the focus of this symposium. Contributions are invited on all aspects of flow systems with electrochemical detection and are expected to range from theory, to design, to applications for the study of real-world problems.

Symposium Organizers
Vincent Vivier (Coordinator), LISE - CNRS UPR15, France vincent.vivier@upmc.fr
Ingrid Fritsch, University of Arkansas, USA
Lane Baker, University of Indiana, USA
Daniel Mandler, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel

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Symposium 3:
Electrochemical Approaches to Clinical Diagnostics and Medical Devices

Sponsored by:
Division 1, Analytical Electrochemistry

Division 2, Bioelectrochemistry

This symposium covers the broad field of science and technology where electrochemistry is utilized to develop diagnostic instruments for diseases and medical devices in the broadest sense.

Topics include:
- Electrochemical biosensors and arrays for medical diagnostics
- Cancer diagnostics using electrochemical arrays
- Automated multiplexed electrochemical and ECL immunoarrays
- Electrochemical detection of DNA damage and DNA oxidation
- Measuring proteins and other molecular biomarkers for disease
- Electrochemistry in cell signaling and communication
- Electrochemistry in design and development of medical devices
- Medical devices at the interface of medicine, biology and electrochemistry

Symposium Organizers
James F. Rusling (Coordinator), University of Connecticut, USA james.rusling@uconn.edu
Fethi Bedioui, Université Paris Descartes - Chimie ParisTech, France
Woonsup Shin, Sogang University, South Korea
Frédérique T. Deiss, Indiana University Purdue University Indianapolis, USA

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Symposium 4:
Bioelectrochemistry without Borders

Sponsored by:
Division 2, Bioelectrochemistry

Bioelectrochemistry aims to understand electron transfer processes in biology, from living cells to enzymes. In this symposium, we will discuss new fundamental concepts, from electron transfer in single biomolecules, metabolic chains, molecular assemblies, membranes, and cells to biocatalysis. Papers presenting experimental as well as theoretical and modeling aspects of biological electron transfer systems and processes are invited.
Imaging of nanostructured interfaces as well as spatio-temporal analysis of biological activity on electrode surfaces will be highlighted. New experimental tools will be discussed, which expand bioelectrochemistry with surface analytical techniques, and push the design limits of bioelectrochemistry, biosensors and bioenergy devices.
Applications of electrochemistry in biosensors and bioelectronic devices, biocatalysis for fuel production, energy production via enzymatic or microbial fuel cells, photosynthetic system exploration, waste degradation, and CO2 reduction, will be emphasized.

Topics include but are not limited to:
- Theoretical or experimental approaches that lead to improved understanding of the electrochemical and catalytic behavior of biological systems
- Surface analytical methods coupled to electrochemistry for imaging biointerfaces and for providing structural and spatio-temporal information of bio-objects
- Bioelectrocatalysis using nanoparticles, supramolecular assemblies, or mesoporous networks
- Biosensors and bioanalytical devices
- Biofuel cells
- Photobioelectrochemistry
- Bioelectronics

Symposium Organizers
Elisabeth Lojou (Coordinator), CNRS Marseille, France lojou@imm.cnrs.fr
Shelley Minteer, University of Utah, USA
Lars Jeuken, University of Leeds, UK
Scott Calabrese Barton, Michigan State University, USA

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Symposium 5:
Novel Materials and Devices for Energy Storage:
Batteries for Tomorrow’s World

Sponsored by:
Division 3, Electrochemical Energy Conversion and Storage

The next generation of advanced rechargeable batteries will continue to rely on Li-ion chemistry, possibly with the integration of alloying, conversion and conversion-alloying anode materials. Post Li-ion systems such as Me-S, Na-ion, etc. are expected to enter the market, however, in the foreseeable future. Irrespective of the technology, the development of a detailed understanding of the fundamental properties of battery materials and the interactions of these materials with their environment will be the key to further improvements in the energy density, safety, and lifetime of batteries. The electrolyte is also crucial for the improvements of these devices, especially with respect to safety. This symposium is therefore devoted to recent progress in the fundamental science related to batteries, especially for advanced battery systems. Studies related to all other (applied) aspects of batteries, including solid-state electrolytes, are also welcome.

Symposium Organizers
Robert Kostecki (Coordinator), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, USA R_Kostecki@lbl.gov
Stefano Passerini, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Germany
Daniel Abraham, Argonne National Laboratory, USA
Vojtech Svoboda, Binergy Scientific, USA
Brett Lucht, University of Rhode Island, USA

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Symposium 6:
Fuel Cells and Electrolyzers

Sponsored by:
Division 3, Electrochemical Energy Conversion and Storage

Topics will include but are not limited to:
- Synthesis and design of fuel cell materials (catalysts, electrolytes, gas diffusion layers, bipolar plates, etc.) and materials for low and high temperature electrolyzers
- New experimental approaches for characterization of fuel cell and electrolyzer materials
- Novel catalysts for oxygen reduction, and electro-oxidation of hydrogen and organic fuels
- Fuel cell electrolyte materials synthesis, structural and electrochemical characterization
Improved understanding of electrochemical reaction processes in fuel cells
- New insights into the degradation and aging modes of component materials and failure mechanisms of fuel cells and electrolyzers
- Fuel cell in-operando diagnostics, in situ characterization

Symposium Organizers
Hiroyuki Uchida (Coordinator), Clean Energy Center, University of Yamanashi, Japan h-uchida@yamanashi.ac.jp
Piotr Zeleney, Los Alamos National Lab, USA
Deborah Jones, Université Montpellier 2, France
Bryan Pivovar, NREL, USA

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Symposium 7:
Supercapacitors from Materials and Processes to Applications

Sponsored by:
Division 3, Electrochemical Energy Conversion and Storage

This symposium will concern all fundamental and practical aspects of electrochemical capacitor research, development, and applications, with a focus on materials and systems sustainability. Studies on advanced electrode materials and electrolytes and new fabrication processes are welcome. Novel characterization techniques, including in-situ and in-operando methods for the study of the electrode/electrolyte interfaces, and modeling studies will be considered. New concepts and new devices for applications ranging from micro- to large-size energy storage, with attention to materials and system integration, will be included.

Symposium Organizers

Francesca Soavi (Coordinator), University of Bologna, Italy francesca.soavi@unibo.it
John Miller, JME, USA
Andrew Herring, Colorado School of Mines, USA
Roseanne Warren, University of Utah, USA

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Symposium 8:
Dealloying: Fundamentals, Application, and Control

Sponsored by:
Division 4, Electrochemical Materials Science

Although traditionally considered as a corrosion subject, dealloying studies have found a growing base among many different disciplines where the word “nano” is a commonly used prefix. Selective dissolution of a less noble component from binary or ternary alloys has been shown to be of interest as a fabrication route for high surface to volume ratio materials and structures with applications in catalysis, energy storage, electronics, sensing, separations, and others. This symposium provides a forum for discussion of fundamental processes controlling the morphology evolution during dealloying and its applications in different fields. The relation between dealloying conditions and resulting material properties are discussed, benefiting from the synergy between well-designed experiments and theory and simulations.

Symposium Organizers
Nikolay Dimitrov (Coordinator), SUNY at Binghamton, USA dimitrov@binghamton.edu
E. Jennings Taylor, Faraday Technologies, USA
Natasa Vasiljevic, University of Bristol, UK
Thomas Moffatt, NIST, USA

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Symposium 9:
Ionic liquids as Media for Electrochemical Synthesis

Sponsored by:
Division 4, Electrochemical Materials Science

This symposium will discuss latest results on the use of ionic liquids (ILs) in electrochemical reactions. Such processes usually exploit the large electrochemical windows of ILs. Both experimental and theoretical papers are welcome. Examples are the electrodeposition of reactive metals such as aluminum, tantalum, niobium, titanium, or of other metals/semiconductors/alloys that cannot be electrodeposited from aqueous electrolytes, or applications of ILs for energy conversion and storage. Papers on new analytical methods, such as in situ Raman Spectroscopy, Atomic Force Microscopy, Scanning Tunneling Microscopy or X-Ray Photoelectron spectroscopy, used for (in situ) characterization of the electrochemical process in ILs are encouraged. Theoretical approaches could discuss the structure and dynamics of the bulk and the electrode-electrolyte interfaces of ILs.

Symposium Organizers
Roberto Torresi (Coordinator), Univ. de Sao Paulo, Brazil rtorresi@iq.usp.br
Charles Hussey, University of Mississippi, USA
Andreas Bund, Technische Universitaet Ilmenau, Germany

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Symposium 10:
Corrosion: Fundamentals, Passivity, and Prevention

Sponsored by: Division 4, Electrochemical Materials Science

The goal of this symposium is to address the range of issues pertinent to corrosion and passivity. The breadth of the topic is intended to cover the latest developments, with particular focus on new scientific advances regarding: corrosion, passive films, in-situ corrosion measurements, and corrosion in harsh environments (e.g. nuclear, bio). Topics in closely related areas will also be considered, including environmentally assisted corrosion, corrosion modeling and the advanced characterization of corrosion.

Symposium Organizers
Scott Lillard (Coordinator), University of Akron, USA lillard@uakron.edu
David Shifler, Naval Research Lab, USA
Nick Birbilis, Monash University, Australia,
Homero Castaneda, Texas A&M University, USA

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Symposium 11:
Synthesis and Applications of Electrochemically Active Materials

Sponsored by:
Division 4, Electrochemical Materials Science
Division 6, Molecular Electrochemistry

This symposium will cover all aspects of electrochemically active materials as well as molecular and supramolecular architectures, ranging from their modeling and syntheses and characterization to various applications in functional electrodes (electrochemical energy conversion and storage, sensors, actuators, micro/nanoelectronics, electrochromic devices, etc.). The materials under discussion include, but are not limited to, conjugated and redox-active polymers, ion-intercalation solids, carbon-based and other highly porous materials, nanostructured and functionalized surfaces and thin layers, and electrocatalysts.

Symposium Organizers
Francesco Paolucci (Coordinator), University of Bologna, Italy francesco.paolucci@unibo.it
Mikhail A. Vorotyntsev, D. Mendeleev University of Chemical Technology, Russia
Ross Milton, University of Utah, USA
Giovanni Zangari, University of Virginia, USA


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Symposium 12:
Electrochemical Technology for solving 21st Century Challenges

Sponsored by:
Division 5, Electrochemical Process Engineering and Technology

Electrochemistry and electrochemical technology in particular is used in a range of industries and offers prospective solutions to many important global challenges, including pollution abatement, resource sustainability by recycling valuable and scarce materials, and energy conversion, storage and utilization efficiency. To solve these problems, existing technologies may be optimized using recently developed tools change to e.g. in material science or mathematical modeling, and novel technological approaches may offer new opportunities and processes. The Symposium aims to address these issues and to provide a broad forum for exchange of information, not only between academic research groups, but also between academia and industry.

Symposium Organizers
Gerardine Botte (Coordinator), Ohio University, USA botte@ohio.edu
Karel Bouzek, Institute of Chemical Technology Prague, Czech Republic
Geoffrey H. Kelsall, Imperial College London, UK
Joaquin Rodriguez Lopez, University of Illinois, USA

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Symposium 13:
The Green Potential of Molecular Electrochemistry

Sponsored by:
Division 6, Molecular Electrochemistry

Electrochemistry is naturally suited to the principles of green chemistry: use of green solvents (ionic liquids, water, alcohol, solvents from renewable resources, ...), use of green catalysts immobilized or not, recyclability, miniaturization of cells and electrodes (e.g. microfluidic systems), easy separation of electrodes and products, the use and exploitation of biomass, use of a variety of energy sources, preparation of fine chemicals, safety, and other factors as well. The Symposium will address fundamental aspects, recent developments, in terms of electrosynthesis with original strategies, mechanistic investigations, new applications, modified surfaces, flow electrochemistry, strategies for asymmetric synthesis, combined methods, biomass, biomimetic methods, and so on. The purpose of the Symposium is thus to bring together the leading scientists working in all the aspects of organic and organometallic electrosynthesis in order to stimulate intensive discussions and improve collaborations within the electrochemical and the synthetic communities.

Symposium Organizers
Daniel Little (Coordinator), University of California, Santa Barbara, USA little@chem.ucsb.edu
Marilia O. F. Goulart, Universidade Federal de Alagoas, Brazil
Olivier Buriez, Ecole Normale Superieure, France
Carlos Frontana, Centro de Investigacion y Desarrollo Tecnologico en Electroquimica S. C., Mexico


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Symposium 14:
Let there be Light in Electrochemistry: From Electrogenerated Chemiluminescence to Fluorescence

Sponsored by:
Division 1, Analytical Electrochemistry
Division 2, Bioelectrochemistry
Division 6, Molecular Electrochemistry

The ability to merge intimately electrochemistry with luminescence offers the opportunity to develop original analytical strategies and to acquire complementary information on complex phenomena. For example, electrogenerated chemiluminescence (ECL) is a powerful technique with extremely broad applications, such as light-emitting devices, immunoassays, biosensors, etc. The great success of ECL for in vitro diagnosis with hundreds of millions dollars in sales per year greatly promotes recent ECL studies and significant development.
This symposium will address fundamental aspects, recent developments, bioanalytical and commercialized applications of ECL and of fluorescence combined with electrochemistry. We wish to cover future development of the field which may include new molecular luminophores, nanoluminophores (metal cluster, nanostructured carbon, Q-dots, nanohybrids), high-throughput assays, bipolar electrochemistry, point-of-care testing, microchips, mechanistic study, light emitting electrochemical cells, etc. The purpose of this symposium is thus to bring together the leading scientists working in all these aspects, in order to stimulate intensive discussions and initiate collaborations in these topics within the electrochemical community.

Symposium Organizers
Gary Blanchard (Coordinator), Michigan State, USA blanchard@chemistry.msu.edu
Zhifeng Ding, University of Western Ontario, Canada
Pawel Krysinski, University of Warsaw, Poland
Neso Sojic, University of Bordeaux, France
Giovanni Valenti, University of Bologna, Italy

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Symposium 15:
Physical and Interfacial Electrochemistry: Structural, Spectroscopic, and Theoretical Studies of the Electrochemical Interface

Sponsored by:
Division 7, Physical Electrochemistry

This symposium focuses on spectroscopic, structural, electrochemical, analytical and theoretical investigations of the electrified interface with the objective of identifying and quantifying atomic-level phenomena playing important roles in electrochemical adsorption and faradaic reactions. Recent advances in ex situ and in situ experimental methodologies, in combination with progress in the development of theoretical and computational approaches, create suitable conditions for obtaining a detailed picture of interfacial structures in relation to their surface and bulk compositions. These developments are fundamental in recognizing structure-reactivity relationships. The symposium will cover a broad range of topics from fundamental studies of interfacial phenomena, employing a variety of experimental and theoretical methods, to the design, fabrication and characterization of materials of relevance to both well-established as well as emerging electrochemical technologies.

Symposium Organizers
Jamie Noël (Coordinator), The University of Western Ontario, Canada jjnoel@uwo.ca
Pawel J. Kulesza, University of Warsaw, Poland
Daniel Scherson, Case Western University, USA


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Symposium 16:
Electrochemistry of Metal Clusters and Nanoparticles

Sponsored by:
Division 6, Molecular Electrochemistry
Division 7, Physical Electrochemistry

Monolayer-protected metal clusters (MPCs) and small nanoparticles characterized by a well-defined composition are very promising materials in various applied areas, such as catalysis, sensing and biomedicine. MPCs and nanoparticles display chemical and physicochemical properties that are defined, mostly but not exclusively, by their size. When very small, they display a distinct electrochemical behavior or, more generally, a well-defined electrochemical activity. The ease by which they can undergo reduction or oxidation, also through surface modification, makes them as valuable electron-transfer reactants or redox catalysts in which the metal core may play an active role. Therefore, the number of electrochemical studies of MPCs and nanoparticles in solution, supported on electrodes, or in films keeps increasing. This symposium will highlight the most recent advances in this broad area with a special emphasis on the pivotal role played by electrochemistry and electrochemical methods in understanding the properties of these nanomaterials on a molecular level and developing possible redox applications.

Symposium Organizers
Flavio Maran (Coordinator), University of Padova, Italy flavio.maran@unipd.it
Anne Co, Ohio State University, USA
Dongil Lee, Yonsei University, South Korea
Michael V. Mirkin, City University of New York Energy Institute, USA

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Symposium 17:
Advances in Theory and Modeling of Electrochemical Systems

Sponsored by:
Division 7, Physical Electrochemistry

Physical-mathematical theory and electrochemical simulations provide increasingly powerful tools to understand, predict and interpret phenomena in electrochemical materials and systems. Relations between structure, properties and performance of any electrochemical material or system must be investigated in consistency with basic theoretical principles of transport and reaction phenomena. This fundamental rationale applies across scales and disciplines, including: molecular electrochemical processes in complex matter; charge storage and transfer at microscopic electrochemical interfaces; electrostatic, kinetic and transport phenomena in nanostructured materials; self-assembly and emergence of structure vs. property relations in random heterogeneous materials for ion transport, charge storage and charge transfer (e.g. colloids, porous media, composites); interplay of functional components and electrochemical cells in energy storage and conversion systems. The symposium will address the full bandwidth of methods and approaches and it will showcase numerous applications of modeling tools to basic understanding of electrochemical phenomena, materials design, advanced diagnostics and optimization of complex electrochemical systems. Contributions will embrace spatial scales from the atomic to the macroscopic level, and time scales from fast reactions to long-term degradation processes.

Symposium Organizers
Michael Eikerling (Coordinator), Simon Fraser University, Canada meikerl@sfu.ca
Alejandro A. Franco, Université de Picardie Jules Verne, France
Adam Weber, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, USA
Douglas P. Riemer, Hutchinson Technology, Inc., USA

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Symposium 18:
Education for Electrochemistry and Electrochemical Engineering

Sponsored by:
all divisions
Co-Sponsored by the Electrochemical Society (ECS)

Following the successful symposium on education held at the 64th annual meeting in Mexico, the objective of this symposium, jointly sponsored by ISE and ECS, is to provide a forum for original contributions covering present and future trends in electrochemistry and electrochemical engineering education at undergraduate and/or graduate levels. Papers shall discuss the teaching of fundamental principles, applied techniques, experimental design, curriculum design, evaluation strategies, modeling and simulation of experimental data from the educational standpoint.

Topics of interest include but are not limited to:
-
Alternative enunciations and discussions of selected electrochemistry, electrochemical, and corrosion principles,
- Presentation of the theory and applications of applied techniques for optimal understanding,
- Factors involved in the design of electrochemical and corrosion experiments for the educational laboratories,
- The importance of interdisciplinary contributions to the learning of electrochemistry and corrosion,
- Strategies for modeling and simulation of experimental data from the educational standpoint,
- Curriculum design for electrochemistry, electrochemical engineering, and corrosion courses,
- Question and problem design and evaluation of learning in electrochemistry and corrosion courses.

Symposium Organizers
Ignacio Gonzalez (Coordinator), Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana – Iztapalapa, Mexico igm@xanum.uam.mx
Johna Leddy, University of Iowa, USA
Jorge Ibanez, Universidad Iberoamericana, Mexico

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Symposium 19:
General Session

Sponsored by: All Divisions

This Symposium will cover all ISE areas not compatible with topical symposia.

Symposium Organizers
John Stickney (Coordinator), University of Georgia, USA stickney@uga.edu
Gery R. Stafford, NIST, USA

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